SICK SAD WORLD

Banning identity

Posted in Oh hell no by Nancy on June 16, 2010

What’s been pissing me off this week? At the top of the shit pile was Manurewa Cosmopolitan Club’s seemingly innocuous ‘hat ban’, that ended up revealing the group’s full-blown racism.

The club banned Karnail Singh from a public function held in his honour, because of a ban on ‘hats’. After the embarrassing incident, the club voted to keep the ban, despite the fact that it would alienate South Auckland’s large Sikh community.

A private club has a right to enforce its rules. But it was a breach of human rights to enforce those discriminatory rules at a public function. I hope they get hauled over the coals by the Human Rights Commission.

These UN-cosmopolitan buffoons fail, or refuse, to realise the most basic truth: a Sikh’s turban is NOT a ‘hat’ – it is a part of the Sikh identity, not a fashion to be worn by choice.

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In a similar vein, it’s almost amusing that people who can see the blatant injustice in banning turbans cannot see the injustice of France’s ban on hijabs in public schools. I constantly hear people making cracks about veiling and denouncing the hijab, imposing (hypocritical) Western standards on another culture and faith. Just because anything to do with Islam is treated with suspicion and demonised by the West does not give people a free pass to mock symbols of someone’s identity.

Many Muslim women who live under oppressive regimes are forced to wear the hijab. However, the hijab tradition does not stem from any regime; it is part of the Islamic faith. Many Muslim women wear the hijab by choice, just as Sikh men wear the turban and Orthodox Jewish women wear the head scarf.

Those who seek to ban the hijab because it is ‘oppressive’ are stripping women of their choice to identify with Islamic tradition.

To many Muslim women, a hijab is a declaration of faith and empowerment. Forcing a woman to remove her veil can cause psychological trauma. Those who wear it by choice do so for many reasons.

Following list is from here

How some Muslim women have reported on the empowerment through veiling:
-To them it is a declaration of their faith and loyalty to Allah
-Allows them to be viewed and interacted with as a human being, and not as a sexual object to be gawked at.
-Gives them confidence when interacting in mixed-gender settings.
-Seen for their brains first, and body later.
-When they accomplish something, they know it is because they truly earned it through hard work, and not because of their sex appeal.
-One woman remarked it as the “most dramatic, proactive, feminist statement that I could make in my personal life, an in-your-face-rebellion against the feminine mystique” (I Just Want to Be Me: Issues of Identity for One American Muslim by Pamela Taylor, page 120)
-Seen as a resistance to Western ideology and culture, and allows them to maintain their own distinct identity without the Western world’s attempts at assimilation. For countries where Islam is not the majority, it gives women a sense of security and cultural identity.
-It allows women to be a part of both worlds – it allows them to preserve their own religious identity, cultural history and background, while living in another country.